10 Thanksgiving Foods Never Feed Your Dog

10 Thanksgiving Foods Never Feed Your Dog

Do you know the Thanksgiving foods never feed your dog?  While we feel especially thankful for our loved ones on Thanksgiving, letting our beloved four-legged family members munch off the table can be a true hazard to their health. While animal lovers know what’s harmful for Fluffy and Fido to ingest, it’s wise to make an announcement at the holiday table before you catch your pet snacking on scraps. After all, an emergency trip to the veterinarian’s office is no proper way to polish off your Turkey Day.

Ahead of Nov. 23, check out this expert-approved roundup of ten sweets and treats that you should never feed your dog or cat from the Thanksgiving table.

1. Turkey

Don’t let your pet take a bite of Thanksgiving’s signature dish if it’s been smothered in garlic, butter or seasonings, as these can be extremely toxic. If the meat is totally plain, boneless and well cooked however, your dog or cat will be fine to nibble on it, according to the American Kennel Club and WebMD.

 

2. Ham

Another foods never feed your dog many don’t know.  Poultry dish that’s a no-go, pet insurance carrier Pets Best says that pork products can lead to pancreatitis, vomiting and diarrhea in pets. Further, even small portions of the fatty meat can cause obesity in smaller dogs and cats.

thanksgiving food never feed your dog

3. Stuffing

Unfortunately, this holiday favorite is off the table for cats and dogs. Wild mushrooms, grapes, raisins, and especially onions can be destructive to your pet’s delicate system.

“No matter what form they’re in (dry, raw, cooked, powder, or within other foods), onions are some of the absolute worst foods you could possibly give your pup (it’s poisonous for dogs, and it’s even worse for cats),” Sadie Cornelius, Marketing Director for Canine Journal told Reader’s Digest.

 

4. Sweet potatoes

If you like your Turkey Day sweet potatoes covered in marshmallows and spices, Fluffy and Fido shouldn’t dare take a bite: the sweet seasonings can lead to an upset stomach, fast. Served ungarnished, though, sweet potatoes are perfectly fine, according to the ASPCA.

 

5. Pumpkin pie

While a traditional slice of pumpkin pie is off-limits for your four legged friends, they can safely get into the festive holiday fun if they want to try plain, canned pumpkin, People reports. A surefire new favorite, pure pumpkin also aids with digestion.

6. Salty snack foods

While us humans can never get enough of potato chips, pretzels and popcorn, these salty treats can lead to “excessive thirst and urination, or even sodium ion poisoning” in our favorite dogs and cats, according to the ASPCA.

7. Nuts

Similarly, nuts are bad for pets, too, the ASPCA states. Not only can almonds, pecans and walnuts, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and even pancreatitis in cats and dogs, ingesting macadamia nuts can lead to “weakness, depression, vomiting, tremors and hyperthermia.”

8. Chocolate

One of the simplest desserts can be fatal for dogs and cats alike, according to PetMD. An ingredient in chocolate called theobromine is the trouble, and can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, and seizures, as well as death.

9. Coffee and caffeine

Likewise, methylxanthine-loaded coffees and caffeinated drinks and are very dangerous for pets to eat. If Fluffy and Fido accidentally slurp up a caffeinated drink, it can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death, the ASPCA reports.

10. Alcohol

Come on, really? Just like people, pets can suffer from alcohol poisoning, whether it’s through alcoholic liquids or rum cake. PETA states that even in small doses, intoxication can lead to seizures, respiratory failure and death.

Article Source:  Fox News

See lists of other foods never feed your dog

on our website:

40 Foods to Never Feed Your Dog- Part 1

40 Foods to Never Feed Your Dog – Part 2

40 Foods to Never Feed Your Dog – Part 3

40 Foods to Never Feed Your Dog – Part 4

 

foods never feed your dog

Posted in Buddy Beds Orthopedic Memory Foam Dog Beds, Dog Health, Dog Safety, Thanksgiving Tips | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Traditional, Classic, Favorite Thanksgiving Side Dishes

 

Traditional Thanksgiving Side Dishes

Because the turkey is only as good as the sides you serve with it. Fill your plate with these idesa for the tastiest sides/

Classic Side Dishes 

Here are a few traditional favorites:

  1.  Stuffing – there are a million recipes
  2. Mashed potatoes
  3. Sweet potatoes
  4. Gravy
  5. Green bean dishes
  6. Cranberries and cranberry sauces
  7. Pearl onions
  8. Butternut squash
  9. Brussel sprouts
  10. Candied yams
  11. Acorn squash
  12. Beets
  13. Cornbread

Thanksgiving Side Dishes Recipes

Where to Find Good Recipes

(surely you will find some yummy ideas here)

  1.  Allrecipes.com
  2. Food Network.com – 100+ Classic Thanksgiving Side Dishes
  3. CookingchannelTV.com – 98 Best Thanksgiving Side Dishes
  4. MarthaStewart.com – Easiest Thanksgiving Side Dishes
  5. CountryLiving.com – 100+ Easy Thanksgiving Side Dishes

 

Napkin FoldingTomorrow’s Post:  Fun Napkin Folding

Posted in Buddy Beds Orthopedic Memory Foam Dog Beds, Thanksgiving Tips | Tagged , | Leave a comment

How to Carve Your Thanksgiving Turkey

How to Carve a TurkeyHow the Carve a Turkey this Thanksgiving

Not sure how to carve a Turkey?  This Thanksgiving, Americans will cook and consume over 40 million turkeys, yet very few of them will be carved in a stress- and mess-free manner, that doesn’t also waste waste your carefully prepared bird.

So we asked Jeffrey Elliot, chef and director of culinary relations of Zwilling J.A. Henckels, and co-author of The Complete Book of Knife Skills: The Essential Guide to Use Techniques and Care, to show us, step-by-step, the best way to carve a Thanksgiving turkey.

1.

How to Carve a Turkey

 

Place the turkey on the cutting board or a platter, breast side up, with the legs facing away from you. Steady it with the carving fork in your guide hand.

 

2.

 

Cut through the skin that connects one leg to the carcass, cutting as close to the leg as possible.

Cut through the skin that connects one leg to the carcass, cutting as close to the leg as possible.

 

3.

 

Set down the knife and pull the leg away from the bird until the ball joint that connects it to the carcass pops out of the socket. (If the turkey is too hot to handle, use a clean, dry towel to protect your hands.)

Set down the knife and pull the leg away from the bird until the ball joint that connects it to the carcass pops out of the socket. (If the turkey is too hot to handle, use a clean, dry towel to protect your hands.)

 

4.

 

Cut straight through the joint with the knife. The leg will now pull easily away from the carcass.

Cut straight through the joint with the knife. The leg will now pull easily away from the carcass.

 

5.

 

Lay the leg on the board, with the knee facing you, and feel for the joint connecting the drumstick bone and the thigh bone.

Lay the leg on the board, with the knee facing you, and feel for the joint connecting the drumstick bone and the thigh bone.

 

6.

 

Cut straight down along the bone, removing the meat in one piece.

Cut straight down along the bone, removing the meat in one piece.

 

7.

 

Rotate the drumstick and continue cutting straight down along the bone until all the meat is removed from the bone.

Rotate the drumstick and continue cutting straight down along the bone until all the meat is removed from the bone.

 

8.

Bias-cut the drumstick meat into serving-size pieces.

 

9.

 

Hold the knife blade parallel to the board and slip it underneath the bone. Cut along the length of the bone to free it from the meat. Pull the bone away from the meat.

 

10.

How to Carve a Turkey

Flip the thigh so that it’s skin side up and bias-cut it into serving-size slices.

 

11.

Repeat previous steps with the other thigh.Repeat previous steps with the other thigh.

 

12.

 

Work the tip of the knife between the ball joint of the wing and the socket.

Work the tip of the knife between the ball joint of the wing and the socket.

 

13.

How to Carve a Turkey

 

Cut all the way through the joint, through any meat and skin, and remove the wing from the carcass.

 

14.

How to Carve a Turkey

 

Rotate the turkey so that the other wing is facing your guide hand. Repeat previous steps to remove it.

15.

How to Carve a Turkey

 

Make a long, thin cut along the breastbone, in the center of the breast.

 

16.

How to Carve a Turkey

 

Let the knife blade ride the rib cage straight down to the socket where the wing was attached.

 

17.

How to Carve a Turkey

 

Cut along the bottom of the breast to remove that half completely.

 

18.

How to Carve a Turkey

 

Lay the breast half on the cutting board, skin side up, and bias-cut it into serving-size slices.

Source:  Huffington Post 11/16/2016

 

Tomorrow’s Post:

Popular Traditional Best-Loved Thanksgiving Side Dishes

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Buddy Beds Orthopedic Memory Foam Dog Beds, Thanksgiving Tips | Tagged , , | 7 Comments

Cook a Turkey – How to Cook the Perfect Thanksgiving Turkey

 

How to Cook a Turkey to Perfection

How to Cook a Turkey

From the Butterball Turkey Kitchens . . . .

HOW TO ROAST

How to cook a Turkey?  Oven roasting is simple, convenient and delicious—no wonder it’s so popular! Whether you’re a first time cook or a seasoned pro.

Since turkey cook time varies by weight, we’ve provided a handy chart below to help you. Don’t forget the foil tent when you’re 2/3 of the way through cooking to prevent dryness!

 

FRESH OR FROZEN WHOLE TURKEYS

Roasting a whole turkey is easier than you think. Just follow these simple instructions for a fresh or thawed turkey:

  • Preheat oven to 325° F. Drain juices and pat dry with clean paper towels.
  • Place turkey breast side up on a flat rack in a shallow roasting pan 2 to 2½ inches deep.
  • Turn the wings back to hold the neck skin in place. (Tucking the wings will help stabilize the turkey in the pan and when carving)   Brush or spray skin lightly with vegetable or cooking oil for best appearance.
  • Insert an oven-safe meat thermometer deep into the lower part of the thigh without touching the bone. When the thigh is up to temperature, and if the turkey is stuffed, move the thermometer to the center of the stuffing.
  • Place your turkey in the oven.
  • When the turkey is about ⅔ done, loosely cover breast and top of drumsticks with a piece of foil to prevent overcooking.
  • Your turkey is done when the temperature with a meat thermometer is 180° F in thigh and 165° F in breast or stuffing.
  • Lift turkey onto platter, and let stand for 15 minutes before carving.
ROASTING TIP
If you don’t have a rack, crunch aluminum foil into a coil or use vegetables like carrots to keep your turkey off the bottom of the pan.
How to Cook the Perfect Turkey

 Tomorrow’s Post:

How to Carve a Turkey Like a Pro

 

Source:  Butterball.com

Posted in Thanksgiving Tips | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Frozen Turkey? How to Properly Thaw a Turkey

HOW TO THAW A TURKEY

How to Properly Thaw a Frozen Turkey

Safely thawing a turkey is one of the most important steps in your meal prep.

  • Refrigerator thawing is preferred and the least labor-intensive but requires more time.
  • Cold water thawing takes less time but requires more attention.

Regardless of which method you choose, never thaw a turkey at room temperature. If you’re running low on time, try a Fresh Whole Turkey—they’re just as delicious and require little prep.

How to Properly Thaw a Turkey

WAYS TO THAW

Frozen Whole Turkeys and Frozen Whole Turkey Breasts need to be thawed before cooking. For the best results, follow one of these methods:

REFRIGERATOR THAWING

  • Thaw breast side up, in an unopened wrapper on a tray in the fridge (40 degrees F or below).
  • Allow at least 1 day of thawing for every 4 lbs.
  • Keep turkey in original wrapper and place on tray.
  • Use within 4 days after thawing.

COLD WATER THAWING

  • Thaw turkey breast side down, in an unopened wrapper, with enough cold water to cover your turkey completely.
  • Change water every 30 minutes and if turkey cannot be completely covered, rotate every 30 minutes to keep the thawed turkey chilled.
  • Estimate a minimum thawing time of 30 minutes per lb.

USE THIS HELPFUL CALCULATOR TO DETERMINE THAWING TIME – FROM THE BUTTERBALL PEOPLE

THAWING CALCULATOR

How to Properly Thaw a Turkey

WHAT NOT TO THAW

Some Butterball products are made to go from freezer to the oven, skillet or grill without thawing. Be sure not to thaw our:

Frozen Stuffed Whole Turkeys
Frozen Ready to Roast Breast Roasts
Frozen Ready to Roast Boneless Roasts

WHEN TO FREEZE

For the best flavor, you should use our products by their use-by date. However, if you’re unable to cook the food by then you can save it for later by safely freezing it with these instructions:

  • Freeze the product before the use-by date.
  • Thaw using the Refrigerator Thawing or Cold Water method above.
  • Consume product within 2-4 days of thawing.

SOURCE:  BUTTERBALL.COM

THANK YOU BUTTERBALL FOR SUCH HELPFUL INFORMATION!

 

Posted in Dog Beds, Thanksgiving Tips | Tagged , , | 1 Comment